Download Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)justice PDF

Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)justice

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ISBN : 9781788112840
Pages : 224 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (849 Download)

Download Free Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)justice PDF by George R. Goethals Full Book and published by . This book was released on 2018 with total page 224 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This collection of original essays and commentary considers not merely how history has shaped the continuing struggle for racial equality, but also how backlash and resistance to racial reforms continue to dictate the state of race in America. Informed by a broad historical perspective, this book focuses primarily on the promise of Reconstruction and the long demise of that promise. It traces the history of struggles for racial justice from the post US Civil War Reconstruction through the Jim Crow era, the Civil Rights and Voting Rights decades of the 1950s and 1960s to the present day. The book uses psychological, historical and political perspectives to put today's struggles for justice in historical perspective, considering intersecting dynamics of race and class in inequality and the different ways that people understand history. Ultimately, the authors question Martin Luther King, Jr.'s contention that the moral arc of the universe bends toward justice, challenging portrayals of race relations and the realization of civil rights laws as a triumph narrative. Scholars in history, political science and psychology, as well as graduate students in these fields, can use the issues explored in this book as a foundation for their own work on race, justice and American history.


Download Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)Justice PDF

Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)Justice

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Publisher : Edward Elgar Publishing
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ISBN : 1788112857
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (112 Download)

Download Free Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)Justice PDF by Julian Maxwell Hayter Full Book and published by Edward Elgar Publishing. This book was released on with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This collection of original essays and commentary considers not merely how history has shaped the continuing struggle for racial equality, but also how backlash and resistance to racial reforms continue to dictate the state of race in America. Informed by a broad historical perspective, this book focuses primarily on the promise of Reconstruction, and the long demise of that promise. It traces the history of struggles for racial justice from the post US Civil War Reconstruction through the Jim Crow era, the Civil Rights and Voting Rights decades of the 1950s and 1960s to the present day.


Download German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era PDF

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN : 1107031931
Pages : 279 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (31 Download)

Download Free German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era PDF by Alison Clark Efford Full Book and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2013-05-20 with total page 279 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study reframes Civil War-era history, arguing that the Franco-Prussian War contributed to a dramatic pivot in Northern commitment to African-American rights.


Download Democracy's Reconstruction PDF

Democracy's Reconstruction

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN : 019537729X
Pages : 215 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (377 Download)

Download Free Democracy's Reconstruction PDF by Lawrie Balfour Full Book and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2011-03-16 with total page 215 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Democracy's Reconstruction, the latest addition to Cathy Cohen and Fredrick Harris's Transgressing Boundaries series, noted political theorist Lawrie Balfour challenges a longstanding tendency in political theory: the disciplinary division that separates political theory proper from the study of black politics. Political theory rarely engages with black political thinkers, despite the fact that the problem of racial inequality is central to the entire enterprise of American political theory. To address this lacuna, she focuses on the political thought of W.E.B. Du Bois, particularly his longstanding concern with the relationship between slavery's legacy and the prospects for democracy in the era he lived in. Balfour utilizes Du Bois as an intellectual resource, applying his method of addressing contemporary problems via the historical prism of slavery to address some of the fundamental racial divides and inequalities in contemporary America. By establishing his theoretical method to study these historical connections, she positions Du Bois's work in the political theory canon--similar to the status it already has in history, sociology, philosophy, and literature.


Download The Arc of a Bad Idea PDF

The Arc of a Bad Idea

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN : 0199386277
Pages : 224 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (386 Download)

Download Free The Arc of a Bad Idea PDF by Carlos Hoyt Full Book and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2016-01-19 with total page 224 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For the vast majority of human existence we did without the idea of race. Since its inception a mere few hundred years ago, and despite the voluminous documentation of the problems associated with living within the racial worldview, we have come to act as if race is something we cannot live without. The Arc of a Bad Idea: Understanding and Transcending Race presents a penetrating, provocative, and promising analysis of and alternative to the hegemonic racial worldview. How race came about, how it evolved into a natural-seeming aspect of human identity, and how racialization, as a habit of the mind, can be broken is presented through the unique and corrective framing of race as a time-bound (versus eternal) concept, the lifespan of which is traceable and the demise of which is predictable. The narratives of individuals who do not subscribe to racial identity despite be ascribed to the black/African American racial category are presented as clear and compelling illustrations of how a non-racial identity and worldview is possible and arguably preferable to the status quo. Our view of and approach to race (in theory, pedagogy, and policy) is so firmly ensconced in a sense of it as inescapable and indispensible that we are in effect shackled to the lethal absurdity we seek to escape. Theorist, teachers, policy-makers and anyone who seeks a transformative perspective on race and racial identity will be challenged, enriched, and empowered by this refreshing treatment of one of our most confounding and consequential dilemmas.


Download The Racial Order PDF

The Racial Order

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Publisher : University of Chicago Press
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ISBN : 022625366X
Pages : 520 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (253 Download)

Download Free The Racial Order PDF by Mustafa Emirbayer Full Book and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2015-08-04 with total page 520 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Proceeding from the bold and provocative claim that there never has been a comprehensive and systematic theory of race, Mustafa Emirbayer and Matthew Desmond set out to reformulate how we think about this most difficult of topics in American life. In The Racial Order, they draw on Bourdieu, Durkheim, and Dewey to present a new theoretical framework for race scholarship. Animated by a deep and reflexive intelligence, the book engages the large and important issues of social theory today and, along the way, offers piercing insights into how race actually works in America. Emirbayer and Desmond set out to examine how the racial order is structured, how it is reproduced and sometimes transformed, and how it penetrates into the innermost reaches of our racialized selves. They also consider how—and toward what end—the racial order might be reconstructed. In the end, this project is not merely about race; it is a theoretical reconsideration of the fundamental problems of order, agency, power, and social justice. The Racial Order is a challenging work of social theory, institutional and cultural analysis, and normative inquiry.


Download Community Wealth Building and the Reconstruction of American Democracy PDF

Community Wealth Building and the Reconstruction of American Democracy

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Publisher : Edward Elgar Publishing
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ISBN : 1839108134
Pages : 296 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (18 Download)

Download Free Community Wealth Building and the Reconstruction of American Democracy PDF by Melody C. Barnes Full Book and published by Edward Elgar Publishing. This book was released on 2020-10-30 with total page 296 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: How can we create and sustain an America that never was, but should be? How can we build a robust multiracial democracy in which everyone is valued and everyone possesses political, economic and social capital? How can democracy become a meaningful way of life, for all citizens? By critically probing these questions, the editors of Community Wealth Building and the Reconstruction of American Democracy seize the opportunity to bridge the gap between our democratic aspirations and our current reality.


Download Arc of Justice PDF

Arc of Justice

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Publisher : Henry Holt and Company
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ISBN : 1429900164
Pages : 432 pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (9 Download)

Download Free Arc of Justice PDF by Kevin Boyle Full Book and published by Henry Holt and Company. This book was released on 2007-04-01 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.


Download Managing Inequality PDF

Managing Inequality

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Publisher : NYU Press
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ISBN : 1479849200
Pages : 343 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (849 Download)

Download Free Managing Inequality PDF by Karen R. Miller Full Book and published by NYU Press. This book was released on 2017 with total page 343 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Managing Inequality, Karen R. Miller examines the formulation, uses, and growing political importance of northern racial liberalism in Detroit between the two World Wars. In the wake of the Civil War, many white northern leaders supported race-neutral laws and anti-discrimination statutes. These positions helped amplify the distinctions they drew between their political economic system, which they saw as forward-thinking in its promotion of free market capitalism, and the now vanquished southern system, which had been built on slavery. But this interest in legal race neutrality should not be mistaken for an effort to integrate northern African Americans into the state or society on an equal footing with whites. During the Great Migration, which brought tens of thousands of African Americans into Northern cities after World War I, white northern leaders faced new challenges from both white and African American activists and were pushed to manage race relations in a more formalized and proactive manner. The result was northern racial liberalism: the idea that all Americans, regardless of race, should be politically equal, but that the state cannot and indeed should not enforce racial equality by interfering with existing social or economic relations. Miller argues that racial inequality was built into the liberal state at its inception, rather than produced by antagonists of liberalism. Managing Inequality shows that our current racial system—where race neutral language coincides with extreme racial inequalities that appear natural rather than political—has a history that is deeply embedded in contemporary governmental systems and political economies.


Download Crusader for Justice PDF

Crusader for Justice

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Publisher : Wayne State University Press
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ISBN : 0814338461
Pages : 368 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (338 Download)

Download Free Crusader for Justice PDF by Peter J. Hammer Full Book and published by Wayne State University Press. This book was released on 2013-11-15 with total page 368 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Honorable Damon J. Keith was appointed to the federal bench in 1967 and has served as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit since 1977, where he has been an eloquent defender of civil and constitutional rights and a vigorous enforcer of civil rights law. In Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith, authors Peter J. Hammer and Trevor W. Coleman presents the first ever biography of native Detroiter Judge Keith, surveying his education, important influences, major cases, and professional and personal commitments. Along the way, the authors consult a host of Keith's notable friends and colleagues, including former White House deputy counsel John Dean, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, and industrialist Edsel Ford II for this candid and comprehensive volume.Hammer and Coleman trace Keith's early life, from his public school days in Detroit to his time serving in the segregated U.S. army and his law school years at Howard University at the dawn of the Civil Rights era. They reveal how Keith's passion for racial and social justice informed his career, as he became co-chairman of Michigan's first Civil Rights Commission and negotiated the politics of his appointment to the federal judiciary. The authors go on to detail Keith's most famous cases, including the Pontiac Busing and Hamtramck Housing cases, the 1977 Detroit Police affirmative action case, the so-called Keith Case (United States v. U.S. District Court), and the Detroit Free Press v. Ashcroft case in 2002. They also trace Keith's personal commitment to mentoring young black lawyers, provide a candid look behind the scenes at the dynamics and politics of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and even discuss some of Keith's difficult relationships, for instance with the Detroit NAACP and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Judge Keith's forty-five years on the bench offer a unique viewpoint on a tumultuous era of American and legal history. Readers interested in Civil Rights-era law, politics, and personalities will appreciate the portrait of Keith's fortitude and conviction in Crusader for Justice.More information can be found at crusaderforjustice.com


Download Racism and Resistance PDF

Racism and Resistance

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Publisher : SUNY Press
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ISBN : 1438485980
Pages : 376 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (485 Download)

Download Free Racism and Resistance PDF by Timothy Joseph Golden Full Book and published by SUNY Press. This book was released on 2022-11-01 with total page 376 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: African American legal theorist Derrick Bell argued that American anti-Black racism is permanent but that we are nevertheless morally obligated to resist it. Bell—an extraordinary legal scholar, activist, and public intellectual whose academic and political work included his employment as a young attorney with the NAACP and his pivotal role in the founding of Critical Race Theory in the 1970s, work he pursued until he died in 2011—termed this thesis “racial realism.” Racism and Resistance is a collection of essays that present a multidisciplinary study of Bell's thesis. Scholars in philosophy, law, theology, and rhetoric employ various methods to present original interpretations of Bell's racial realism, including critical reflections on racial realism’s relationship to theories of adjudication in jurisprudence; its use of fiction in relation to law, literature, and politics; its under-examined relationship to theology; its application in interpersonal relationships; and its place in the overall evolution of Bell’s thought. Racism and Resistance thus presents novel interpretations of Bell’s racial realism and enhances the literature on Critical Race Theory accordingly.


Download Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health PDF

Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN : 0199389861
Pages : 448 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (389 Download)

Download Free Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health PDF by Ellen L. Idler Full Book and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2014-08-13 with total page 448 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Frequently in partnership, but sometimes at odds, religious institutions and public health institutions work to improve the well-being of their communities. There is increasing awareness among public health professionals and the general public that the social conditions of poverty, lack of education, income inequality, poor working conditions, and experiences of discrimination play a dominant role in determining health status. But this broad view of the social determinants of health has largely ignored the role of religious practices and institutions in shaping the life conditions of billions around the globe. In Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health, leading scholars in the social sciences, public health, and religion address this omission by examining the embodied sacred practices of the world's religions, the history of alignment and tension between religious and public health institutions, the research on the health impact of religious practice throughout the life course, and the role of religious institutions in health and development efforts around the globe. In addition, the volume explores religion's role in the ongoing epidemics of HIV/AIDS and Alzheimer's disease, as well as preparations for an influenza pandemic. Together, these groundbreaking essays help complete the picture of the social determinants of health by including religion, which has until now been an invisible determinant.


Download Teaching White Supremacy PDF

Teaching White Supremacy

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Publisher : Pantheon
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ISBN : 0593316649
Pages : 465 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (316 Download)

Download Free Teaching White Supremacy PDF by Donald Yacovone Full Book and published by Pantheon. This book was released on 2022-09-27 with total page 465 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A powerful exploration of the past and present arc of America’s white supremacy—from the country’s inception and Revolutionary years to its 19th century flashpoint of civil war; to the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s and today’s Black Lives Matter. “The most profoundly original cultural history in recent memory.” —Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harvard University “Stunning, timely . . . an achievement in writing public history . . . Teaching White Supremacy should be read widely in our roiling debate over how to teach about race and slavery in classrooms." —David W. Blight, Sterling Professor of American History, Yale University; author of the Pulitzer-prize-winning Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom Donald Yacovone shows us the clear and damning evidence of white supremacy’s deep-seated roots in our nation’s educational system through a fascinating, in-depth examination of America’s wide assortment of texts, from primary readers to college textbooks, from popular histories to the most influential academic scholarship. Sifting through a wealth of materials from the colonial era to today, Yacovone reveals the systematic ways in which this ideology has infiltrated all aspects of American culture and how it has been at the heart of our collective national identity. Yacovone lays out the arc of America’s white supremacy from the country’s inception and Revolutionary War years to its nineteenth-century flashpoint of civil war to the civil rights movement of the 1960s and today’s Black Lives Matter. In a stunning reappraisal, the author argues that it is the North, not the South, that bears the greater responsibility for creating the dominant strain of race theory, which has been inculcated throughout the culture and in school textbooks that restricted and repressed African Americans and other minorities, even as Northerners blamed the South for its legacy of slavery, segregation, and racial injustice. A major assessment of how we got to where we are today, of how white supremacy has suffused every area of American learning, from literature and science to religion, medicine, and law, and why this kind of thinking has so insidiously endured for more than three centuries.


Download Litigating Across the Color Line PDF

Litigating Across the Color Line

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN : 019024920X
Pages : 352 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (249 Download)

Download Free Litigating Across the Color Line PDF by Melissa Milewski Full Book and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2017-11-01 with total page 352 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: As a result of the violence, segregation, and disfranchisement that occurred throughout the South in the decades after Reconstruction, it has generally been assumed that African Americans in the post-Reconstruction South litigated few civil cases and faced widespread inequality in the suits they did pursue. In this groundbreaking work, Melissa Milewski shows that black men and women were far more able to negotiate the southern legal system during the era of Jim Crow than previously realized. She explores how, when the financial futures of their families were on the line, black litigants throughout the South took on white southerners in civil suits and, at times, succeeded in finding justice in the Southern courts. Between 1865 and 1950, in almost a thousand civil cases across eight southern states, former slaves took their former masters to court, black sharecroppers litigated disputes against white landowners, and African Americans with little formal education brought disputes against wealthy white members of their communities. As black southerners negotiated a legal system with almost all white gate-keepers, they found that certain kinds of cases were much easier to gain whites' support for than others. But in the suits they were able to litigate, they displayed pragmatism and a savvy understanding of how to get whites on their side. Their negotiation of this system proved surprisingly successful: in the civil cases African Americans litigated in the highest courts of eight states, they won more than half of their suits against whites throughout this period. Litigating Across the Color Line shows that in a tremendously constrained environment where they were often shut out of other government institutions, seen as racially inferior, and often segregated, African Americans found a way to fight for their rights in one of the only ways they could. Through these suits, they adapted and at times made a biased system work for them under enormous constraints. At the same time, Milewski considers the limitations of working within a white-dominated system at a time of great racial discrimination--and the choices black litigants had to make to get their cases heard.


Download United States Government Organization Manual PDF

United States Government Organization Manual

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Publisher :
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ISBN :
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (48 Download)

Download Free United States Government Organization Manual PDF by Full Book and published by . This book was released on 1966 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:


Download To Know the Soul of a People PDF

To Know the Soul of a People

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN : 0190082682
Pages : 289 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (82 Download)

Download Free To Know the Soul of a People PDF by Jamil W. Drake Full Book and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2022 with total page 289 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "The folk category has often been used to highlight the vibrant religious cultures of marginal communities in the U.S. To Know the Soul of a People, though sympathetic to this perspective, shows how the category in the study of religion contributed to shaping the perceptions of black and lower-class communities in American social and political thought. From 1924 to 1941, a cadre of social scientists used the category in their field studies of black rural populations in the poor South. Charles Johnson, Guy Johnson, Lewis Jones, Alison Davis, Gunnar Myrdal and other second-generation male social scientists deployed the category to jettison biological views of racial inferiority in order to amplify prejudice and "stagnant" economy that they felt contributed to the social status of black (and white) rural communities in the Jim Crow south. But the reformist agenda of the social scientists took a detour away from prejudice and socioeconomic conditions to concentrate on the cultural and behavioral deficits of America's folk population. Perusing field-notes, correspondences, proposals, monographs, this book argues that these liberal-minded social scientists had a hand in the making of a folk population on the basis of their perceived antiquated and underdeveloped religious behaviors. Jamil W. Drake demonstrates how the religion of rural black communities in the social sciences laid the seeds to the ideas of the culture of poverty after World War II"--


Download A Realistic Blacktopia PDF

A Realistic Blacktopia

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN : 0197622127
Pages : 321 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (622 Download)

Download Free A Realistic Blacktopia PDF by Derrick Darby Full Book and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2022-12-02 with total page 321 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "The United States is dogged by racism and racial disparities in income, wealth, health, education, and criminal justice. Philosophers disagree on what kind of politics is needed to address this problem. Do we pursue race-specific remedies to undo racism or do we assume the permanence of racism and opt for non-race-specific remedies in pursuit of a more egalitarian society? Paradoxically, the way to make racial progress in racist America is to downplay race. In A Realistic Blacktopia political philosopher Derrick Darby challenges the "small tent" approach by examining U.S. Supreme Court cases on education and voting rights arguing that they hold general lessons about the limits of racial politics. He further argues that pursing non-race-specific remedies with maximal democratic inclusion is a necessary strategy for mitigating racial inequality and achieving racial justice. Securing racial justice in racist America - where the myth of postracialism prevails in law, politics, and social psychology - calls for "big tent" remedies. Anti-racists must build coalitions among marginalized populations interested in issues that impact them collectively. A Realistic Blacktopia offers clarity on how racism persists contrary to claims that America is a postracial society. It explains why the myth of postracialism cannot be ignored in crafting remedies for racial inequality. It supplies a principled pragmatic proposal for achieving racial justice. Drawing on the political thought of Martin Luther King Jr., W. E. B. Du Bois, and the black radical tradition, the book also explains why achieving racial justice requires inclusive democracy"--